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Norfolk Island Fitness and Health News


FITLOSOPHY: "YOU vs YOU! Be your own motivation!"

FOODLOSOPHY: Part 2 ... Foods which HARM your Gut bacteria

  • Too much alcohol
  • Artificial Sweeteners
  • High Saturated Fat diets
  • High Animal Protein Diet
  • Food Additives (check the labels)

JULY MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL continues for 2 more weeks with a FREE program included.

OR .... maybe our 8 WEEK BODY BLITZ PROGRAM is for you (2 Month Membership with TLC)?

All Gym inquiries to Kay on 52809.

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Making Schools Happy for Good Mental Health


Schools across Victoria in Australia are about to get a whole lot happier, with a recent injection of $6.39 million into positive education initiatives involving 27 state schools. Dubbed the “happiness revolution”, this mental health promotion project aims to protect students and teachers from depression by teaching them how to be resilient and flourish.

The first school-based project of this kind was started in Geelong Grammar, an elite private school in Victoria, in 2008. With a strong commitment to preparing their students for the future, Geelong Grammar invited Dr Martin Seligman and his team from the University of Pennsylvania to assist with designing a whole-school approach to promoting wellbeing as a core outcome across all levels of the education curriculum.

Dr Seligman is recognised worldwide as the “father of positive psychology” and has been responsible for triggering a profound shift in psychology practice from a medical symptom-based model to a biopsychosocial model based on building human strengths to buffer people against the risks of mental illness.

Ten years on, Positive Education as it became known has swept the world and many schools now integrate coaching for a “life well lived” into their programs. The International Positive Education Network (IPEN) provides a central portal for much of this work.

Evidence of the success of this approach for promoting mental health in schools has posed many challenges. Schools by definition provide an environment that in principle aims to foster the best in children whilst also providing teachers with a work space that is meaningful and satisfying career-wise. The boundary between academic learning and life-skills learning is blurred since both are entwined – feeling good is a necessary component for cognitive development.

Likewise, debate continues regarding the definitions of “resilience” and “wellbeing”, and how these can be operationalised into teachable packages. Whilst research in positive psychology has demonstrated benefits of activities such as reflections on good things in life, envisioning one’s best self, showing gratitude toward others, and identifying and using one’s strengths, we still have limited long-term evidence of the mental health impact of these activities on children’s development especially their potential capacity for positive mental health throughout their lives. Trying to evaluate these outcomes independent of other influences like family, peer groups, the local community, public policies, and broader cultural, historical, and social patterns continues to challenge researchers.

Despite this, the groundswell of government commitment to making schools more than just a place for academic learning is growing. The New Zealand Curriculum provides guidance for schools on how to design their curricula in order to cultivate key competencies for life and lifelong learning like resilience or goal-setting. Scotland’s ‘Curriculum for Excellence’ is driven by positive educational principles aimed at making students more than just successful learners but aims to foster confident individuals, responsible citizens, and effective contributors to the social good. Even Bhutan, the first country to employ the concept of ‘Gross National Happiness’ to measure societal progress, has experimented with a wellbeing curriculum that teaches mindfulness, coping with emotions, and problem-solving, with well-evaluated and highly significant outcomes.

The World Bank is running a large randomized controlled trial aimed at cultivating grit – passion and perseverance in the pursuit of long-term goals – among middle-school students in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. UNICEF has just recently introduced its ‘Happy Schools’ framework to improve learner well-being in the Asia- Pacific region with particular focus on its relevance for developing countries.

Concern about the rise of mental ill-health, particularly depression and anxiety and its burden on society, is global and doesn’t appear to be lessening despite huge investments by governments in public health infrastructure to tackle the problem. In western countries, schools increasing face challenges of antisocial behaviour amongst students, and a steady outflow of teachers leaving the profession in despair. Something has to be done. And if it takes a shift in education policy, backed up by meaningful investment of money, to adopt a whole new approach to education then this would seem to be a wise move. So congratulations to the Victorian government for its initiative!

Dr Kate Lemerle, Psychologist

Chrysalis Counselling & Coaching, Norfolk Island

WEB: www.chrysaliswellnessservices.com

TEL: 52112 or email drkate@iinet.net.au 

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Norfolk Island Fitness and Health News


Jump into July and start the second half of the year and warm your Winter with our healthier Lifestyle choices.

  • 8 WEEK BODY BLITZ PROGRAM ... a 2 Month all inclusive program to a healthier you.
  • FOODLOSOPHY (Part 1) .... Top Foods for better GUT Health: Kimchi, Yoghurt, Artichokes, Garlic, Green Bananas, Cacao, Wheat Bran, Barley, Apples
  • FITLOSOPHY ... Motivation Made Simple! ...
      • Vocalise your daily target
      • Have Fun. Choose a workout you enjoy
      • SLEEP. Go to bed early the night before
      • COMMIT. "pay" in advance.
      • Get up. Dress up. Show up. Never give up. REPEAT!
Kay Taylor

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Sleep Apnoea and Mental Health


The link between sleep disorders and mental health is now well established. At any given time, nearly half of all adults are affected with one or more sleep problems. Sleep problems can be secondary to other conditions, like stress, they can be a side effect of medications, or they can signal underlying physical or brain-based disturbances.


Sleep problems like insomnia can occur when people react to life stressors with obsessive worry. Some antidepressants may worsen or induce primary sleep disorders like restless legs syndrome, sleep bruxism (teeth grinding), REM sleep behaviour disorder (sleep-walking), nightmares, and sleep apnoea.


Lifestyle-related factors like poor diet or lack of exercise with weight gain can result in disorders like sleep apnoea. Pain is a common physical cause of sleep problems. And in some cases, changes to brain function such as a fault in the "internal body clock" (circadian rhythm) or mismatch between this and the external environment is the cause. This is often found in shiftworkers, and increasingly found in young people who spend many hours at night on their smartphones.


Snoring is estimated to be the most common sleep problem. Snoring occurs when the muscles in the throat that hold open the pharynx (at the back of the of the tongue) relax, partially choking the airway. This blocking causes the pharyngeal walls to vibrate, giving the sound of snoring. A UK study found that 41.5% of the adult population snore. The male to female ratio is approximately 2:1, with about twice as many males snoring compared to females. It affects 2–5% of all children and is associated with cognitive and behavioural problems, resulting in poor school performance.


Whilst snoring alone might not be a major problem for the snorer, it can cause sleep disorders for their partners. This is because regularly disturbed sleep can reset your own brain’s circadian rhythm (sleep-wake cycle).


Sleep deprivation has serious physical and mental consequences including mood instability, impaired memory, decreased concentration, changes to brainstem activity resulting in hyper-aroused sympathetic system activity, and even specific changes to your genes. To check whether you might be suffering from sleep problems, try the Epworth Sleepiness Scale at https://www.kinnect.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale-Questionnaire1.pdf


Snoring doesn’t necessarily predict sleep apnoea, but it can be an easy frontline indicator.  One study showed that 76% of the habitual snorers and 64% of the non-habitual snorers had apnoea-hypopnoea scores >0 presumably with snoring (that is, they showed signs of brain oxygen deprivation). Diagnosis of sleep apnoea, especially when it comes to monitoring reduction in airflow, oxygen saturation, cardiac activity, and EEG, is a complex process and often considered too intrusive so many people go undiagnosed. Home-based portable devices are proving more acceptable and can provide a primitive diagnosis sufficient to start therapy. Given the severity of health impacts of sleep apnoea, though, routine screening and early intervention are highly recommended.


Guidelines published in 2017 by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommend that doctors routinely screen for risk factors linked to sleep apnoea. Warning signs include:


  • Frequent reports of low energy, daytime fatigue, or difficulty staying asleep throughout the night
  • Loud snoring, witnessed apnoea or gasping or choking
  • Diagnosed hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Overweight or neck circumference> 40cm
  • Waking in the morning with a sore throat or dry mouth
  • Morning headaches
  • Frequent night-time urination (often between 2:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m.)
  • New onset of symptoms during perimenopause or menopause in women.

To find out more about Apnoea and other sleep disorders, including non-medical treatment approaches, join the half-day workshop on Tuesday 26 June with Professor Leon Lack from Flinders University.


Dr Kate Lemerle, Psychologist

Chrysalis Counselling & Coaching, Norfolk Island

WEB: www.chrysaliswellnessservices.com

TEL: 52112 or email drkate@iinet.net.au

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Health Tip of the week


Forward locomotion such as walking or running is actually the process of losing and catching one's balance.

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Fitness Tip of the Week - PROTEIN


Add protein to smoothies. I like BiPro protein as there’s no added sugars or artificial flavors.

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Health Tip of the week


Forward locomotion such as walking or running is actually the process of losing and catching one's balance.

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Fitness Tip of the Week - PROTEIN


Add protein to smoothies. I like BiPro protein as there’s no added sugars or artificial flavors.

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Norfolk Island Fitness and Health News


FITLOSOPHY: Movement is medicine for creating change in a person's physical, emotional and mental states.


FOODLOSOPHY: Drinking a few large lattes a day is the equivalent of eating an extra meal.


Want some encouragement through the dark and cold Winter months?


Consider our 8 week BODY BLITZ program ... a 2 month Membership with PT and lots of TLC!!!


MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL: Free program with every 3, 6 or 12 month membership in JUNE and JULY.


LORNA JANE TIGHTS SALE ... $60 for 4 days only ... starts Monday 11th June.


All Gym inquiries to Kay on 52809.

Please 'contact us' for more information.

Thriving in Retirement: Making Life Meaningful After Work


Baby Boomers - the 5.5 million people born between 1946 and 1965 - have been retiring now for some ten years. Hot on their heels are the Generation X-ers – the 6.5 million people born 1965 to 1984 – now in their mid-fifties and heading towards retirement. The Baby Boomers comprise about 24% of Australia’s population, and the Gen-X-ers make up another 28%. That means over half Australia’s population is facing retirement.


So you’re certainly not alone…but what does retirement mean for YOU?


Even if you’re well and truly over the drudgery of work, stepping out of the workforce is a significant life change. Many people will have struggled with the dilemma of when to make the move, typically weighing up financial matters. Fewer will consider less measurable factors such as the impact on their identity, being solely responsible for managing the structure of their days, or having other people at hand to chew the fat. If you’re not working, who are you and what do you do?


Many people facing retirement will think back to the days their own parents retired. Many with a sense of dread. Recalling their grandparents in rocking chairs waiting for death to snap them up, or worse still, withering away in squalid nursing homes, doesn’t imbue retirement with much of a glow!


Others who have had careers that filled their life with satisfaction, meaning, and excitement face the prospect of life without their career with despair. Even more so when considering retirement could last 28 years now that almost 1-in-5 people live to age 90.


Many people put a lot of thought and planning into their financial portfolio in preparation for retirement. Far fewer plan the other side - the emotional, psychological, and social side – with the same attention to detail. They might plan the “trip of a lifetime” touring Europe, or set off and join the grey nomads for a year touring Australia’s outback. After returning home, the future can begin to look very bleak.


Whether you’re still a few years off retirement, or you’re in that slump of “What next?”, here are some practical tips to build up your psychological portfolio for retirement:

  • Do a stocktake of the “If only I had the time…” dreams. In days gone by, what did you dream about experiencing if you didn’t have to go to work? Some call this the bucket list. Now is the time to write your bucket list. Sort these dreams into categories – travel (the places you’d love to see), new skills (learning a language, musical instrument, craft), volunteering (helping out the homeless, tour guiding, running a community group). Even add new career options you never thought would be possible, like teaching private classes or doing that degree or writing the next great novel.
  • Identify your “retirement robbers”.  Are the children planning your retirement as a chance to save on their childcare costs? Have you already become so caught up working for local charities or community groups that there’s no time for you? Learning to graciously say “Thanks for the invitation, I’ll have to check my commitments” is an essential life skill to ensure your retirement is just that – YOUR retirement.
  • Tackle procrastination head-on. This really gets down to taking control over time management. When you went to work, you knew you were being paid for a “good day’s work” and you made sure time was allocated for getting the jobs done. Retirement is no different – each day needs jobs to be done, they may just be much more diverse than those of your working life. Think about retirement as a set of projects – there’s the “staying healthy” project that requires daily activities, there’s the “staying connected” project that requires setting aside time to nurture relationships, there’s the “stretching the mind” project that requires time for learning. Setting up annual, monthly, weekly and daily goals and project task lists is essential. Even making it a project to learn practical tools for overcoming procrastination, then writing your own anti-procrastination guidebook, is a start to conquering this retirement robber.
  • Keep replenishing your relationships. The human brain needs other brains to stay operational. We know this from stories of people who’ve been isolated for long periods of time, and we know it from developmental neuroscience that proves brains grow from interacting with each other. It’s also a sad fact that as we age, the people who made up our social connections begin falling off the perch. Ageing – and death – are facts of life. Bemoaning it won’t change this. So learning to face loss and replenish our lives with new people is not a sign of disrespect for those who have passed on, it’s a healthy way of maintaining a high quality of mental wellbeing right to the end of your own journey. Make sure you allocate fun time to share with your inner circle of loved ones, whilst also seizing opportunities to meet new people of all ages. Join local community groups, offer time as a volunteer, start your own classes mentoring people in skills you have. Set yourself the goal of talking to at least one stranger every day!
  • Plan the legacy you want to leave. There’s nothing more important than the question, “What was the purpose of my life?”. It might seem gloomy to think of this, but inevitably we’ll all face that question at some time. Don’t wait until that moment when you want to beg for an extension of time. What will be the most significant contributions you’ll make for this world? Or the memories you’ll leave behind for your descendants? Retirement is the time to start getting your legacy in order, whether it’s doing the family tree, writing your memoirs, passing on your talents to others, or creating a garden wonderland. Your legacy is the most important project that gives meaning to every day of the rest of your life.

Dr Kate Lemerle, Psychologist

Chrysalis Counselling & Coaching, Norfolk Island

WEB: www.chrysaliswellnessservices.com

TEL: 52112 or email drkate@iinet.net.au

Please 'contact us' for more information.



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