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St John Ambulance Report

Thursday, August 29, 2019


Burns may come from a variety of sources, hot water, fireplaces, chemical or electrical burns, or industrial burns where bitumen may be involved.


WHAT TO DO:           

If clothing is burning, STOP, DROP and ROLL, pull casualty to the ground, roll around the ground and cover with a blanket or jacket until flames are extinguished.

If casualty has suffered a scald from hot liquid, remove damp clothing immediately.

Cool running water is the best thing you can do to help a burn casualty.


AVOID lotions, ointments or other old wife’s tales, such as butter, run cool running water over the burn for 20 minutes, this is the one best treatment you can give.


Remove any items of jewellery or clothing from the burn area UNLESS the item is stuck to the burn area. AVOID touching the burn area, DO NOT burst blisters.


Cover burn with a non-adherent dressing, cling film, a wet clean dressing, we want to avoid having the burn exposed to decrease the risk of infection.


Seek Medical Assistance When: 

The burn is deep, it may not be painful, but it is serious.

When the burn area is significant, larger than a 20-cent piece.

Whenever a burn involves airways, face, hands or genitals.

When you are unsure, St. John Ambulance and NIHRACS are here to help

 If casualty shows of shock or if the person becomes unconscious, call triple zero (000) for the Ambulance, Jimbo will be straight orn et.


For the full copy of the fact sheet, visit link https://www.stjohnnsw.com.au/secure/downloadfile.asp?fileid=1004624

A reminder that the next skill drill will be held on Tuesday 10th September, 6:30pm.


If you are interested in becoming a St John volunteer or would like more information, please email stjohn@ninet.nf or james.garden@stjohnnsw.com.au

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St John Ambulance Report

Thursday, March 07, 2019


Diabetes

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are becoming more prevalent globally and knowing how to assist in the event of a diabetic hyperglycaemia (too high blood sugar) or hypoglycaemia (too low blood sugar) could help save someone’s life.

In the case of a hyperglycaemia, patients may show symptoms such as: excessive thirst, hot and dry skin, blurred vision and a smell of acetone on breathe.

WHAT TO DO:            High blood sugar

  • If the patient has medication, ask if they need assistance taking it but, only help if they request it.
  • Encourage the patient to drink water.
  • Seek medical attention if symptoms get worse.
  • If the patient has not yet been diagnosed with diabetes encourage them to visit their doctor.

In the case of a hypoglycaemia patients may show symptoms such as: lack of concentration, weakness and shaking, sweating, feeling faint or dizzy, headache, irritability, hunger and more

WHAT TO DO:            Low blood sugar

  • Help the patient to sit or lie in a comfortable position.
  • Reassure the patient and loosen any tight clothing.
  • Give the patient sugar, such as fruit juice, soft drink, jellybeans and glucose tablets.
  • Continue to give sugar every 15 minutes until the patient recovers.
  • Follow with carbohydrates such as a sandwich, milk or dry biscuits and cheese.

IMPORTANT:  If patient shows no signs of improvement or, if the patient becomes unconscious, call triple zero (000) for the Norfolk Island St John Ambulance.

For the full copy of the fact sheet, visit link https://stjohn.org.au/assets/uploads/fact%20sheets/english/FS_diabetic.pdf

A reminder that the next skill drill will be held on Tuesday 12 March.

If you are interested in becoming a St John volunteer or, for more information, please email stjohn@ninet.nf

Please 'contact us' for more information.

First Aid Fact Sheets

Friday, March 01, 2019


Did you know that you can get first aid information online?

St John Ambulance Australia has a range of first aid fact sheets which are available for download from their website www.stjohn.org.au

The fact sheets cover a broad range of topics such as, how to deal with an allergic reaction or a concussion to more serious conditions such a heart attacks and strokes. These are a great resource and are available for personal use or, use in the workplace.

The first aid fact sheets contain up to date information and are updated twice a year.

In the event of an emergency, St John Ambulance volunteers are available on Norfolk Island by calling triple zero (000).

The next skill drill will be held on Tuesday 12 March.

If you are interested in becoming a St John volunteer or, if you would like more information on the service, please email stjohn@ninet.nf

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St John Ambulance Report

Thursday, February 07, 2019


In the event of an emergency first aiders follow the steps outlined in DRSABCD.

DRSABCD stands for:

D = Danger

Check the area for danger and ensure it is safe for yourself, others and the patient.

R = Response

Check for a response from the patient for example, ask their name and/or squeeze their shoulders.

S = Send for help

Phone 000 for an ambulance or, ask someone else to help you in make the call.

A = Airway

Open the patient’s mouth and check for foreign objects. If there are any objects place in the recovery position and clear the airway.

To open the airway tilt the patients head backward slightly by tilting the chin.

B = Breathing

Look listen and feel for normal breathing.

C = CPR

If required start CPR.

D = Defibrillation

Follow the voice prompts for defibrillation, if required.

Knowing what to do in the event of an emergency could save someone’s life. To learn more about first aid courses on Norfolk Island, contact St John volunteers via email stjohn@ninet.nf or, visit the St John website https://stjohn.org.au/first-aid-training

For more information on the DRSABCD plan of action visit the St John website at link https://stjohn.org.au/assets/uploads/fact%20sheets/english/DRSABCD%20Action%20Plan.pdf

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St John Ambulance Report

Thursday, January 31, 2019


Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke

The beautiful summer days we are experiencing at the moment are fantastic for spending on the beach, however, the increase in heat also increases the risk of heat-induced illness.

The two most common forms of heat-induced illness are heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat exhaustion is the milder of the two conditions but, if not managed correctly this can develop heat stroke.

Common signs of heat exhaustion include:

  • feeling hot, exhausted, weak, fatigued
  • having a persistent headache
  • thirst
  • nausea
  • feeling faint or dizzy
  • rapid breathing and/or shortness of breath
  • pale, cool, moist skin
  • a rapid, weak pulse

What you can do in this situation:

  • Move the patient to a cool place with circulating air.
  • Help the patient to sit or lie down in a comfortable position.
  • Remove unnecessary clothing from the patient, and loosen any tight clothing.
  • Sponge the patient with cold water.
  • Give the patient cool water to drink.
  • Seek medical aid if the patient vomits or does not recover quickly.

The above information on heat exhaustion as well as information on heat stroke can be found on the St John Ambulance Australia website at link https://stjohn.org.au/assets/uploads/fact%20sheets/english/FS_heat.pdf

Norfolk Island St John Ambulance volunteers are available by phoning 000 in a medical emergency.

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St Johns Ambulance Report

Thursday, January 24, 2019


Are you interested in learning more about first aid?

Would you like to volunteer your time and work with a great team?

St John Ambulance volunteers provide a vital on-call service to the community of Norfolk Island but, they need more helpers to enable them to continue to deliver this valuable service.

There are so many ways that you can help out. You can assist with events, be a member of the on-call team or, help with administrative support.

Full training is provided and volunteers are supported by experienced members.

For more information on how you can get involved email stjohn@ninet.nf or, contact Sally Davie on 51722.

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St John Ambulance Report

Wednesday, August 15, 2018


First Aid Training & Community First Aid Classes

Please email all enquiries to stjohn@ninet.nf


Skill Drill

The next Skill Drill will be held on Tuesday 21 August at the St John shed on Grassy Road. Please join us from 630pm for a 7pm training start. New members are always welcome. 


Volunteers Needed

Please email your expression of interest to volunteer with this important community organisation to stjohn@ninet.nf


St John Tips: First Aid in the Workplace

The responsibility of ensuring workplace safety rests with all employers and employees.  All workplaces have hazards which may or may not be obvious.  They may include aspects of the physical environment, materials and equipment used, and work practices. 


Each State and Territory has a number of Acts, Regulations, Codes of Practice, Compliance Codes and Ordinances which regulate the work environment and provide minimum standards for the protection of workers' health and safety. 


The main role of the first aider in the workplace is to provide first aid management or illness and injury.  Other responsibilities may include: 

- record keeping;

- recognition and reporting of health and safety hazards;

- performing risk assessments;

- participation in safety programs;

- maintenance of a first aid kit and / or first aid room;

- awareness of temporary and permanent staff injuries and illnesses.


Prevention of injury and illness should be of the utmost importance in every workplace.  Injuries can cause much trauma, and cost time and money.  Unsafe working conditions lead to inefficiencies in production.  Ongoing safety education is crucial for the prevention of accidents.  Working according to safe practice guidelines have proven to be efficient in the long term.  


Types of injury in the workplace

Back injuries comprise approximately one quarter of all injuries in the workplace and are the most frequently reported result of industrial accidents or manual handling practices.  Such injuries cause physical suffering to the employee, and cost the employers millions of dollars in lost time and medical expenses.  


Hearing damage can occur in workplaces where there is exposure to constant and / or higher than normal levels of noise.  Most States in Australia have legislation aimed at preserving the hearing of people working in such conditions and requiring the use of protective devices and monitoring employee's exposure. 


Chest and blast injuries and amputation are likely to result from accidents associated with heavy equipment and machinery. 


Accidents with chemicals usually occur in the workplace when workers have a lack of awareness of safety precautions, and do not use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).  First aiders should be familiar with chemicals used in the workplace, and have access to up-to-date Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for those chemicals.  The MSDS provides information on the potential hazards and appropriate first aid management in the event of an emergency. 


In the office environment, awareness of fire evacuation procedures and the location of the nearest fire extinguisher, first aid kit and first aider is essential.  

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St John Article - Saturday 11 August

Thursday, August 09, 2018


First Aid Training & Community First Aid Classes

Please email all enquiries to stjohn@ninet.nf


Skill Drill

The next Skill Drill will be held on Tuesday 21 August at the St John shed on Grassy Road. Please join us from 630pm for a 7pm training start. New members are always welcome. 


Volunteers Needed

Please email your expression of interest to volunteer with this important community organisation to stjohn@ninet.nf


St John Tips: Psychiatric casualties

Always treat people with a psychiatric illness (or those who are impaired by drugs or alcohol) with the same politeness and respect, and compassionate firmness with which you treat others.  Although casualties may appear thought-disordered or violent, they usually remember the details of the situation - sometimes with extreme embarrassment or shame - and the treatment given.  Wherever possible, reassure accompanying family, friends and onlookers, who also may be confused or deeply upset.  


General Management:

Protect yourself and others from getting hurt.  Do not get closely involved unless you are convinced it is safe.  

1.  If you judge it is not safe, call 000 for emergency services.  

     If you judge it is safe:

     - approach the casualty and identify yourself as a first aider.

2.  Check vital signs, if casualty gives you permission to do so.

3.  Check the casualty's level of consciousness by asking name, address, date and whereabouts.

4.  Stay calm, positive and open.  Be polite and respectful.

5.  Encourage the casualty to tell you what is on their mind.  Listen closely.

6.  Do not interrupt, contradict, argue, or falsely reassure casualty.  Don't scold, slap, or attempt to restrain casualty.

7   Call 000 for emergency services when you have enough information.  


Depression and suicidal behaviour

Signs and Symptoms: 

-  sadness, dejection, self-blame, despair, hopelessness;

-  suicidal ideas, eg hinting or even saying explicitly that they will kill themselves;

-  slow movements, decreased or increased appetite, weight loss or gain, insomnia, loss of interest in activities;

-  sudden dramatic change such as from sadness and hopelessness to apparent resolution and happiness may be a sign of impending suicide;

-  a real suicide attempt - however ineffectual this may seem (eg tablets, cutting). 


Management of depression and suicidal behaviour:

1.  Always take any threats of suicide seriously. 

2.  If the situation is life threatening or dangerous, call 000.

3.  Identify yourself as a first aider.

4.  Check vital signs, if the casualty gives you consent.

5.  Check level of consciousness - ask name, address, date and whereabouts. 

6.  Encourage the casualty to talk - listen and remain open, be polite and respectful. 

7.  Attempt to ascertain whether the casualty has suicidal ideas or has taken an overdose. 

8.  Stay with the casualty until help arrives. 

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St John Ambulance Report

Friday, July 27, 2018


First Aid Training & Community First Aid Classes

Please email all enquiries to stjohn@ninet.nf


Skill Drill

The next Skill Drill will be held on Tuesday 7 August at the St John shed on Grassy Road. Please join us from 630pm for a 7pm training start. New members are always welcome. 


Volunteers Needed

Please email your expression of interest to volunteer with this important community organisation to stjohn@ninet.nf


St John Tips: Head Injuries

The head is easily injured because it lacks the padding of other parts of the body.  An injury to this part of the body is of particular concern because of the possibility of injury to the skull.  The seriousness of injuries to the head, neck and spine cannot be overstated.  Once the brain or spinal cord is damaged, the damage may be permanent.  The brain and spinal cord do not regenerate after injury - nerve cells are not renewed.  


Injuries to the head can be complicated by unconsciousness - a sign there is significant brain injury and risk of further injury.  Because the brain is the controlling organ for the whole body, injuries to the head are potentially dangerous and always require medical attention.  When a casualty has a serious head injury, the neck or spine may also be injured.  


Fractures may occur in the cranium, at the base of the skull, or in the face.  The skull may be fractured by a direct force such as a blow to the head or glassing, or indirect force such as a fall from a height and landing heavily on the feet.  

Concussion is an altered state of consciousness where the casualty may become unconscious, but this is often momentary.  Common causes are motor accidents, falls and sports injuries.  The casualty may be dazed, confused and complain of headache and dizziness.  The casualty recovers quickly, but there is always the possibility of serious brain injury.  


Assessment of head injuries

It is often very difficult to make an accurate assessment of the severity of a head injury.  Therefore they should not be disregarded or treated lightly.  The cause of the injury is often the best indication of its severity.  Strong forces will usually cause severe injuries to the head and spine, such as falling from a bicycle without wearing a helmet, or falling from heights such as scaffolding without wearing appropriate rigging equipment, or motorbike and motor vehicle accidents.  

As there is the possibility that complications will develop later, the casualty should always be advised to seek medical aid.  


Signs and Symptoms:

- altered responses to commands and touch;

- wounds to the scalp or face;

- blood or clear fluid escaping from nose or ears;

- pupils becoming unequal in size;

- blurred vision;

- loss of memory. 


Management of head injuries: 

1. Monitor breathing and pulse: 

    - if casualty is unconscious, follow DRSABCD.

    - keep casualty's airway open with fingers (if face is badly injured).

2. Support head and neck:

    - support casualty's head and neck during movement in case the spine is injured.

3. Control bleeding:

    - place sterile pad or dressing over the wound.

    - apply direct pressure to the wound, unless you suspect a skull fracture.

    - if blood or fluid comes from ear, secure a sterile dressing lightly in place and allow to drain.

4. Lie casualty down:

    - place casualty in a comfortable position with head and shoulders slightly raised.

    - be prepared to turn casualty onto their side if they vomit.

    - clear the airway quickly after vomiting.

5. Call 000 for an ambulance. 


Important: 

Wear gloves, if possible, to protect against infection.


If the bleeding does not stop, without disturbing dressing, reposition pad and reapply pressure to control bleeding.

Take extreme care to maintain spine alignment, as twisting, compressing or bending an injured spine may worsen any damage. 

Please 'contact us' for more information.

St John Ambulance Norfolk Island Division

Friday, June 29, 2018


First Aid Training & Community First Aid Classes

Please email all enquiries to stjohn@ninet.nf

Skill Drill

The next Skill Drill will be held on Tuesday 10 July at the St John shed on Grassy Road. Please join us from 630pm for a 7pm training start. New members are always welcome. 


Volunteers Needed

Please email your expression of interest to volunteer with this important community organisation to stjohn@ninet.nf


St John Tips: Burns and Scalds

Burn injuries are extremely painful. Risk of infection is high because the outer layer of skin is damaged. Although they do not bleed, burn injuries result in fluid loss, loss of temperature control, and can damage underlying layers of tissues and nerves. 

If sustained in a confined space, burns may damage the respiratory system and eyes.  The casualty may go into shock as a result of fluid loss. 

As well as the obvious physical damage, burns may cause psychological damage as they can be disfiguring and disabling with an altered body image. 

Burns are primarily caused by scalding from hot liquid or flames and contact with hot objects, but can also be caused by extreme cold, chemicals, electricity, or the sun and other forms of radiation.  Even after the source of the heat has been removed, further damage occurs because soft tissue retains heat for minutes afterwards. 


Cooling the burnt area and preventing infection are the first aider's major objectives.  In some cases, the first aider will also have to monitor the casualty and treat for respiratory distress, cardiac arrest, or shock. 


Types of Burns


Superficial Burns:

In a superficial burn, only the top layer of the skin is damaged.  A common example is radiation by ultraviolet light producing sunburn.  If severe, some fluid may leak into the epidermis causing swelling and blistering. 

Superficial partial thickness burns: 

Occur when the upper layers of the dermis are injured, resulting in leakage of fluid into the tissues, producing blistering.  These burns are commonly caused by brief exposure to flame or spill scalds of 50-70 degrees. The area is red, very painful and blistered with copious tissue fluids. 


Deep partial thickness burns:

Involve the epidermis and much of the dermis.  They are caused by scalds of longer duration or temperature of more than 70 degrees, or exposure to flame.  The area is mottled red and white, dark red or pale yellow, painful, blistered with a moist surface if the blister has broken. 


Full thickness burns:

Involve the epidermis, the entire dermis and may include deeper structures of fat, muscles and tendons.  They may be caused by flame burns, contact with hot metal, immersion scalds, strong chemicals or electricity.  The area is white or charred and feels dry and leathery.  Because the nerves are destroyed, the pain will not be as great in the full thickness burn with pain at the less burned margins.  


General principles for managing burns

1. Follow DRSABCD.

2. Cool the burnt area.

3. Cover burn either with a non-adherent burns dressing, plastic wrap, wet clean dressing or loosely applied aluminium foil. 

4. Prevent infection by covering the burn wound. 

5. Minimise shock by reassurance. 

DO NOT apply lotions, ointments or oily dressings.

DO NOT prick or break blisters.

DO NOT give alcohol.

DO NOT overcool casualty.

DO NOT use towels, cottonwool, blankets or adhesive dressings directly on wound.

DO NOT remove clothing stuck to burnt area. 

Please 'contact us' for more information.



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