NON Awas Salan

NEWS FROM FABIEN LEVI


I hope you, CTC and NI are well?


I’ll do my best to send you a « monthly » email, to keep in touch with you and give news from me.


As from Saturday 21st june and my leaving party at mini bar, my last week of holidays in NI was magic as you could read on the last Norfolk Islander (Ta mini school) and even If I couldn't find the key...


Thank you to everybody (kids and adults) to have come to the airport to tell me goodbye. That was very emoting...


After few days in Brisbane with Di and Talissa, I spent few days in Surfer Paradise and one day in Byron Bay where I met Martyn, Matt and the Chyropractor.


Byron Bay is very beautiful and pretty. Surfer Paradise is too much a business night life with too many buildings, pubs, night clubs, artificial girls...


I left Australia last Sunday 6th July 10am. Di and Talissa were there to tell me goodbye. All my 3 flights (Brisbane/Singapore, Singapore/London and London/Lyon) were very safe and on time! I arrived in Lyon on Monday 7th July 11am. (8.30pm in NI) My last trip was Lyon/Montpellier by train. I arrived at home at 4pm. After a big shower, I slept well and was happy to see again my parents. They are saling their nice house with swimming pool If you are interested?


In Montpellier, I have enjoyed live bands outside. (salsa, balkan...) and seen again my family, my friends...


14th July was the France Day with a lot of fireworks, live bands, events... outside

24th July I’ll go to Paris for one week to see my niece, my sister, friends and for my cousin’s wedding.


Firt week-end of august I’ll go to a firend’s wedding in the south. Then, I’d like to wish good luck to Jason, Jo and NI Teams which will go to Glasgow for the Commonwealth Games. I’ll try to call you If you can give me a phone number over there.

 

At the moment, no positive news from my Australian applications. But, I need to be patient as the job and visa process are very long... From time to time, I coach individual lesson in a private residence of Montpellier that I can be free to enjoy my holidays.

 

Now, let’s enjoy my magic surprises... You just need to click on the links below to share again such good memories with you, your children... Hopefully, the Internet in NI will work...

Please, don’t hesitate to forward my email to NI friends and family, to insert the links on the Norfolk Islander, radio, norfolkonlinenews, blogs...


I have inserted the 1st link below on my website (http://www.pro-tennis-coach.com/Liens.html?lang=en and http://www.pro-tennis-coach.com/Medias.html?&lang=en ) to promote Norfolk island, CTC and my professional experience with you...

 

http://youtu.be/ENT7ZKh6jOc (Beach Tennis for foundation Fay)

 

http://youtu.be/A60g36okltI  (Fab in Norfolk Island)


http://youtu.be/wbFeRQRVhqk (Fab parties in Norfolk Island)


http://youtu.be/Z3BfyQAoBdM (Magic Fab)


http://youtu.be/52AEAkyKuts (Fab's leaving party at CTC)


http://youtu.be/1SuEOOKgPIU ((Fab's leaving party at CTC))

 

I am looking forward to hearing from you, NI, CTC.... 


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MEDIVAC NEED FOR PITCAIRN ISLAND ... by Tim Young


History often has a tendency to repeat itself, but there are times when (thankfully) such is not the case.  However, I suppose I should start at the beginning and give a bit of background.  My family on my father Brian Young's (Pitcairn) side has had a tendency towards diabetes (or, as we call it, "devilbetes").  Both he and myself are no strangers to it, both of us having developed Type 2 Diabetes.  In recent years both of us have been making an effort to counteract this ailment (I've lost 40 kg in the last two years, but still a long way to go).  However, we have both been inconsistent in our attempts to negate the effects of this disease.  A couple of months ago, when I rang home, I was told my father had stood on a Bougainvillea thorn and his foot was infected.  I didn't pay too much attention to it, and passed it off with a customary cheeky remark (I think I called him "skippy" or something like that).  


A week later, I rang home again and found he could barely walk, which caused me some concern, but still I was not completely convinced it was too dangerous.  The very next day I got a message from my mother, and she said that she and my father had been down at the Pitcairn Island health centre, and that though the doctor had got the thorn out three days after stepping on it, infection had developed and antibiotics did not help.  The doctor had told them that they had to look for a ship right away, which shocked them no end.  By this time several of his toes were black and "his foot was swollen and not very pretty."  The doctor was worried that the infection would spread and he could lose one or several toes or even part of his foot.  The reason was that it was so serious that his diabetes which was "poorly controlled" (the consensus of the family as well as all medical practitioners who have examined it).  It just goes to show that one should keep up their fitness and diet regime and do their best not to lag (fact:  I am deeply guilty of this myself.  In the last few months I've been too scared to check the scales).  So off home my parents went and packed quickly as attempts were made to find a ship in the vicinity.  That is one downfall to Pitcairn Islands isolation:  transport.  It was then that the longboat captains said they were willing to take both of my parents to Mangareva in the Gambier Islands (c. 300 miles away).  So the longboat engines were overhauled, fuel loaded onboard, canvas stretched over the canopies and after a prayer from the pastor the boats departed at 10 PM on the evening of Thursday June 26th.

            

Back here in kangaroo-land, I began to grow anxious (I could not contact them after they departed).  Some people contacted me and said that gangrene is so dangerous and deadly (yeah, as if I didn't already know), and so on and so forth (I suppose well-meaning, but not helpful).  There was also the ghost (figuratively) of my uncle Terry "Toge" Young hovering over me.  He had died in 2011 while being evacuated to Mangareva (by a passing yacht, not the longboats), and had died before they could reach there.  So basically I did not sleep for three nights, grew several new strands of grey hair on my beard and kept my internet and phone constantly turned on (I racked up a lot of Elder Scrolls Online hours though!!!).  Thankfully, my worries were unjustified.

            

The two longboats, with four crew each as well as my parents and the doctor took around 36 hours to reach Mangareva, with the doctor constantly monitoring the patient and giving him antibiotics by injection.  They reached Mangareva safely on Saturday June 28th, and both of my parents told me to convey their praise for the bravery of the longboat crew and the professionalism and dedication of the doctor on the voyage.  After a rest the longboat crews departed and safely reached Pitcairn again.

https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif            

The ambulance plane was waiting in Mangareva and took five hours to reach Tahiti where and ambulance awaited them.  The ambulance driver was amazed, recognizing my father from a visit to Pitcairn many years ago when he was one of the crew on a French navy ship, back when my father was magistrate/mayor (it's so long ago it feels as if they were just building the pyramids at Giza, Egypt when that happened).  My father was then admitted to Taaone Hospital in Papeete where his toes were cleaned and suddenly looked different, drawing the interest of many orderlies (I guess they have not seen gorilla-feet before...sorry, I could not resist.  My most insincere apologies to my father).  He was then given a room where it was found that the antibiotics had actually stalled the infection so they put him aside while more urgent operations over the weekend were attended to.  However, on the following Monday he was prepped by the anaesthetist (who, by the way was fascinated by Pitcairn and spent most of the time asking questions about it as my father was on the verge of dreamland.  My father ended up by inviting him to come and stay at our house on Pitcairn when he's in the neighbourhood), and the surgery went underway!

            

Now comes an odd turn in the story.  When my father came to, his right foot was heavily bandaged, and he didn't know which toe he was missing.  When I finally managed to get in contact with them (by that time I was seriously sleep deprived, something I'm still trying to straighten out as I write this) they were not sure about which or how many toes were gone.  Completely relieved and absolutely loopy from lack of sleep I laughed and told my father "welcome to the missing toes club, old man!" (both myself and my mother have had parts of our big toes amputated in the past).  Then, completely relieved I fell asleep on my computer keyboard (when I woke up I had to get a replacement...my wife was not amused!).  We have since found out that he had lost the middle toe on his right foot.  The dressing is currently being changed every day, and little pain compared to when it was infected.  He will be able to walk normally again, and is already taking "baby steps."  My parents will be going back to Pitcairn at the end of August, invigorated from this experience.

            

Well, that is the current situation.  An amazing and successful medivac, and perhaps some insight into the isolation of Pitcairn Island and the nerves of steel of the longboat crews.  Also, a good story of the dangers of "devilbetes" (and planting Bougainvillea...just kidding on that one).

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VALE


Stephen Holder Christian passed away suddenly in Palmerston North, New Zealand late on Tuesday night. 

Stephen was son to the Late Holder and Agnes Christian and brother to Denis, Alison and Sarah Christian. He was a loving husband to Katerina  and doting father  of Jacqueline and Sarah as well as a loving step father of Katerina and Jessie Dixon.


A funeral service will be held in Palmerston North on Saturday afternoon.  Condolences can be sent to Katerina Christian, 52 Joseph Street, Palmerston North, New Zealand

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MEET MISS SIENNA ROSE


NEW to the artists performing on the blackboard at the Norfolk Island RSL memorial club this week was a young Miss Sienna who was headlined to sing on Wednesday 2nd July alongside her father Brandt.


Sienna isn't a stranger to the RSL stage either. When her family lived next door and managed Fletcher Christian apartments, Sienna would often jump up on stage to sing one or two numbers with her dad. At age 2 she was singing nursery rhymes for the diners, at age 3 it was ABBA. By age 5 she was performing block busters like Katy Perry's Firework and The wizard and I (from the musical Wicked) as well as dancing for the youth rockZ concerts held there.


 After dedicating the song Roar to TET (as he thinks she sounds better than Katy Perry herself), she showed that she can also learn new song requests quickly. 2 weeks ago Liz McCoy challenged her to learn & sing 'Happy' by Pharrell Williams which she did very well. There were a few more surprise songs also. She promises to learn many more in the future so she can sing for longer and give her dad a break.

We hope she can be a regular at the RSL as she is an 8 year old girl with a whole lot of talent (and 6 years stage experience already)

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MY LAST FUNNNIEST NORFOLK ISLAND (NI) STORIES ...by FAB


THANK YOU FOR EVERYTHING!

 

First of all, thank you to everybody who went to the Beach Tennis in the most beautiful day of June and to my party at mini-bar. I really appreciated to share this very good time with you ! Thank you very much to Emma and Steve from mini-bar. I remember that Emma was more on the dance floor than behind the bar (Poor Steve…)


TA to the live band for the very good music and atmosphere ! Ryan, where is Scotty from Jo Snow Band ? Even, If you couldn’t find him, you managed very well the live music with Pendo and Wayne until 11pm ! After beating Ryan DIXON 6/0 – 6/0 in 30 minutes early June, he wanted his revenge just after my leaving party. I should confess that he won by walk over as I couldn’t find the key after midnight! Well done Ryan! But, I also won by walk over my bowling revenge last Tuesday 24th June 4.30pm as Ryan couldn’t find the key or couldn’t come… Ryan, the decisive tennis and bowling matches will be played in Norfolk Island before the 9th September 2019, with Scotty to support you!

 

The day after, I enjoyed listening to another band at the Leagues Club  as it was the same of my farewell party at Cheryl Tennis Club. (Ta Gill, Jas, Tony and Carl) I have very nice pictures and videos to show in France of 4 cute little girls (Daphne, Alissa, Ryan/Suzi daughters) who were dancing !

As NI is a little bit tiny, the popular question « where is the key ? » followed me last Sunday night… Ryan, concerning the other question « where is the key ??? …» It’s part of my magic box… Good and funny memories !


Now, try to guess where were my sunglasses that I lost last week-end? They were in the car of the young married lady that I met the first night at Norfolk Blue restaurant… (Crazy!!!…)

After having enjoyed one of my best experience in NI and my last days as a local on holidays, I will have one week of holidays in Queensland. Firstly in Brisbane. Hopefully, with a couple of  job interviews. Secondly in Surfer Paradise to enjoy a lot of mini and crazy bars and to socialise with Aussie ladies… After,  I’ll go back to France for holidays to see my family, my friends and to ask my ex-girlfriends : « Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir… » We never know, one year after…


Hopefully, I’ll find a job in Australia with the 457 work visa sponsorship for the last term 2014.  It would be great as I would be much closer to Norfolk Island than If I was in France !

 

Today, I am leaving Norfolk Island with fantastic, funny memories about my unique adventure here, thanks to you ! You are so friendly, so social, so polite, you have so funny, nice, open minded and very well educated kids and you live in a such beautiful island !

I will miss you and I will definitely come-back before my 40’s to see you again and to beat Ryan again 6/0-6/0 !


Whatever the future, you can be proud of Norfolk Island, of your very friendly community and of you! Norfolk Island will always be unique, like its people! Norfolk Island and its locals will stay in my memories for ever! TA for your hospitality and to have integrated me in your unique island and life for 1 unforgettable year…


Let’s keep in touch by email : FabienLevi@aol.com . My French mobile is on my website with NI colours, photos… : www.pro-tennis-coach.com

 

A bientôt et encore merci pour tout.

 

Fab

PS : Last night, I hope that the pilot drunk only ginger beers and soft drinks. I trust you Emma, Bob and Terrance as I’ll be in the same plane as Coco and a lot of locals !

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CONGRATULATIONS ADEN


Congratulations Aden Cianter,   First Scientific Astronomy Photography 2014


The results of the RASNZ annual astrophotography contest (2014)


Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand (RASNZ)


The judge for this year’s entries is astroimaging legend Eddie Trimarchi from Australia. Eddies fantastic work can be seen at - http://astroshed.com/  Many thanks to Eddie for the time and effort he took in analysing and judging the various entries

Comments as judged by Eddie Trimarchi of Australia (http://astroshed.com).


Scientific – this category was judged on everything that was submitted, not just the photographs. Although scientific results were not verified, the amount of effort in producing each entry played a significant part in choosing the winners.


1st – Movement of the Stars, Aden Ciantar (aged 15) Norfolk Island

 It would be easy to judge this entry solely on the very nice star trail 'overlay' images. However as these were produced in the course of a specific scientific endeavour, complete with method and results, this entry is very impressive.


Conclusion

It is with great pleasure that I was able to see so many fantastic images taken by astronomy enthusiasts from our sister island. The quality of images has been impressive made for some difficult decisions in limiting each category to only the winners. My congratulations go to all who submitted. I am very proud to have been involved in the contest this year and wish you all the best for your future astronomically photographic endeavours.

Best Regards,

Eddie Trimarchi

http://astroshed.com

 

Congratulations Aden on your wonderful photos and star movement study

If anyone is interested in Monthly Astronomy emails, please contact Betty and Stephen Matthews betty@ninet.nf or Betty 57093

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MY VISIT TO PITCAIRN'S ISLAND - November 2013 - March 2014 ... by Colleen Crane


Pitcairn’s Island at first sight is rugged adorned with coconut palms, pandanas and standing tall some stately Norfolk Island pines.

 

The “Claymore 11” transported me to Pitcairn from Taraunga New Zealand this trip took 14 days which I really enjoyed and was lucky to be travelling with Pitcairn Islanders who were returning home after being in New Zealand, Royal Warren who had been to New Zealand for her Granddaughters wedding accompanying her back home was her grandson Jonathan he will be returning to New Zealand on the last rotation of the “Claymore 11”, Daphne Warren, Turi Griffith and Ariel Brown were also travelling home Ariel to see her parents Dave and Lee  and Brother David Brown and would also be returning to New Zealand on the last rotation of the “Claymore 11”.

 

The crew on the “Claymore 11” are very friendly and Jane’s cooking is second to none, but if time is short and finances allow fly to Tahiti and then to Mangareva from there it is a 2 day trip on the “Claymore 11” to Pitcairn’s Island.

 

On arriving at Pitcairn the sea’s at Bounty Bay were a little rough so the “Claymore 11” anchored on the lee of the Island which that day was at Ted side.

 

I was lucky to be on the Bridge when the Captain called Pitcairn and arranged a time for the passengers to be transported to Bounty Bay and then for the cargo to be unloaded, I stayed on the bridge until the Long Boat arrived and was so excited to see Shawn & Randy Christian who I have known since they were young boys.

 

On arriving at the landing it was wonderful to see so many people that I had met over the years when they had visited Norfolk Island.

 

I was lucky to be on Pitcairn a couple of weeks before a cruise ship was due to arrive and to see so many Islanders making curios preparing for its arrival, they will go out in the long boat with all of their beautiful goods Pitcairn Postcards, Stamps, Carvings, Baby baskets, Tee shirts, Jewellery, Honey and Meralda will take her beautiful Tapas’ to sell to the passengers on board.

 

The cruise ship arrived and everyone went to the landing with their bikes pulling trailers loaded with all types of container full of all their wonderful items for trading.

 

The long boat which is housed at the landing in a large shed, was pushed down along steel track into the water and tied to bollards on the landing to be loaded, the boat had 2 layers in the hull of the boat all the boxes, bags, baskets and drums were loaded, and if you are lucky enough to be on Pitcairn when a cruise ship arrives I’m sure you will be overwhelmed as I have been with the way the Islanders assisted each other in loading the long boat, after all the items were packed, sheets of marine ply were placed on top forming a deck the Islanders then loaded onto the long boat sitting on the deck.

 

Don’t forget if you want to visit Pitcairn’s Island you must have a Passport. Booking for accommodation and any of the tours can be made with Pitcairn Tourism Office.

 

There are some amazing walks on this Island with wonderful views, many of the walks should only be taken if with a local guide and even then many are not for the faint hearted like me.

 

There are just so many things that are available for the visitor to do on and around Pitcairn’s Island book a fishing trip with a local for a couple of hours or a tour by boat around the Island, hire a guide to take you snorkeling over the resting place of the Bounty these are all available if the sea’s and weather permit.

 

There are a lot of free things to do as well swimming at the landing is a must and to see the Turtles in the bay is just amazing.

 

Visit the local Museum there are many interesting item to see, take a walk to John Adams resting place and the cemetery.

 

Most important talk to the locals they are a wealth of information about their beautiful Island.

I hope if you visit you enjoy Pitcairn as much as I have and take many special memories of the visit home with you as I will be.

 

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YEAR 9 LANGUAGE CAMP


Last week year 9 were lucky enough to experience the Norfolk year 9 Language camp which went for 3 days. Students had to say goodbye to technology to fully experience the rich culture and tradition of Norfolk. We stayed at the guide hall with the supervision from our year advisor Ms Hale and a few other teachers including Ms Johnson and Ms Peterson, Mr Millett and Mr Wilkinson. This camp was an unforgettable experience for all of us.


Day 1

We all arrived at the guide hall in the morning and were greeted with our first activity of making traditional bamboo rods. We were shown how to do this by some of the local men. We then had to prep all our food with were all traditional Norfolk dishes including breads, pilhai and a wide variety of pies.


We all tasted our first Norfolk lunch and then went down to Kingston to pick Hihis and go fishing with bamboo rods.  Margaret Christian then came down to give us a talk about land and sea birds that come to Norfolk, as well as the problems that these birds face.

In the evening we all helped in making dinner for us and our local guests that were coming to visit us. We concluded the night with a fun came of Jaero and said goodnight with a curfew of 10pm.


Day 2

We all woke up early at 6:00am from a sleepless night. First activity we had was going down to the Pitcairn Village where we met Wiggie and discussed whaling around Norfolk. He showed us a variety of interesting things such as photos from the whaling days.


We then went down to music valley where, Jane Evans gave us an informative talk about tools used back then in grinding corn and also showed us a walking stick her dad made from a bull’s pala. After that, Edie taught all of us how to weave and create a bookmark (lots of us struggled with it). We then had a lot of fun with Maev learning how to dance to pearly shells and the coconut song which the boys seemed to be enjoying a lot.  We all later enjoyed our lunch using a banana leaf as our plate.


For dinner we all went to Wonderland by night which was the best night ever. Many of the islanders joined us for dinner and created a great atmosphere with music. We all had a great night playing musical chairs and statues where Ms Hale was victorious.


Day 3

In the morning Puss Anderson came to the guide hall where we started off our turn around Norfolk Island. We visited various destinations in Kingston and learned many interesting facts that we never knew. After that we enjoyed a delicious morning tea at the old hospital thanks to Colleen and Archie. It was so good that people went back for a fourth scone.


After the tour we all went back to the guide hall where we had to pack up all our stuff and make sure that guide hall was clean. We then went back to Wonderland for lunch and managed to go on the moon buggy and watched Archie’s video of his poem “Daa Baes Said Orn Earth”.


We concluded the camp making sure the guide hall was spotless.


This camp was one of the best experiences that we could ever have and we now all have memories that we will never forget. None of this would’ve been possible without Colleen, Archie and Ms Hale organising this, all the teachers that volunteered to make sure we all behaved and everyone who spared their time to visit us and teach us about Norfolk’s history and culture. So from all year 9, we just want to say “thanks f’ aklan!”


Jeannie, Alicia, Zeak on behalf of Year 9

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MEDIA VISITS NORFOLK ISLAND ... by Leilani Shepherd


If Norfolk Island’s natural beauty and charisma isn’t enough on its own, add in the hype and excitement of Norfolk’s 21st County Music Week and you’ll be left with flocks of eager faces, ready to get themselves tickets and participate in all the action. Amongst the crowds pouring from Sunday’s jam-packed New Zealand flight were Eli Orzessek, a freelance journalist for the New Zealand Herald, keen to watch Kiwi and Aussie fight for their titles in the trans-Tasman battle—and James Borrowdale, a writer for Kia Ora (Air New Zealand’s inflight magazine) whose interest in Norfolk Island’s immense and somewhat famous history drew him here.

I got the chance to catch up with Eli and James, and here’s what they had to say:

Me: Where do you work?

James: I work at a magazine called Kia Ora, which is the Air New Zealand inflight magazine.

Eli: I’m working at the New Zealand Herald currently.

Me: What brings you here?

James: Norfolk Island is a place that we do an article on every year. I was asked if I wanted to go this year and I said yes!

Eli: At the Herald we get e-mails coming through all the time saying that we’ve been invited to see a writer on this trip or that trip. I e-mailed back to this one and they said ‘OK, you can go on it,’ which is cool, because I haven’t been on a travel trip before, so it’s really great to get this opportunity.

Me: Is there anything in particular that you’re going to write about Norfolk?

James: I always find that it’s hard to answer that question before I actually sit down and write things, but there’s such a wealth of things to write about here, because you’ve got, obviously the historical aspect but also such a beautiful place with such beautiful spots that you also have those things that you have to try and get a sense of across to the reader.

Eli: I guess I’m just going to gather up all of my notes at the end and work out what I want to include and touch on and yeah, just pull together all of my favourite things. I really enjoyed the Bounty Folk Museum. I loved all of the scary paper-mache mannequin things, they were cool! It’s quite an interesting collection they’ve got there.

Me: Do you both want to come back?

James: Yeah, I’d love to come back.

Eli: Yeah, it’s cool. It’s been really nice swimming just down the road, that’s for sure!

Thank you James and Eli for visiting and we look forward to reading some wonderful articles about our beautiful island home!

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NORFOLK PUNCHES ABOVE ITS WEIGHT


Norfolk Island has a long history of self-governance, distinguished judges that preside over the Supreme Court of Norfolk Island, and the tall responsibility of enacting legislation that is responsive to the community’s expectations and needs. The manner in which this plays out in legal practice and daily life on Norfolk has long interested local lawyer, Piria Coleman.  

Piria originally trained at the New South Wales Bar in 2012 and 2013 but transferred to the Victorian Bar in 2014. The move provides a better career progression for a legal practitioner whose primary experience is drawn from Norfolk Island. Given that much of the law that applies on Norfolk is drawn from former Victorian Acts and Regulations, there is much insight to be gained from a working knowledge of these laws both in Norfolk and Victoria.

The Victorian Bar’s Readers Course, which Piria was invited to attend, is actively supported by members of the Bar who teach on the course and serve as mentors, as well as by the judiciary, both State and Federal. The former Chief Justice of the Norfolk Island Supreme Court, his Honour Justice Weinberg, was a key note speaker and acknowledged as playing a pivotal role in the development of legal precedent in Norfolk Island.


At the recent ceremony to sign the roll of counsel held in the Supreme Court of Victoria, the Chairman of the Victorian Bar, Will Alstergren QC, addressed the gathering of eminent Queens’ Counsel, Bar Council members, family and friends. He said, “High quality training and skills development is an integral part of maintaining the quality of advocacy essential to the proper administration of justice. These men and women have successfully completed a very rigorous course which requires demonstrated technical legal competence as a precursor to the development of high level advocacy skills.”  

After each of the readers had signed the roll, Mr Alstergren QC, concluded his speech by saying that the life of a barrister could be demanding and stressful, but also brought with it great professional satisfaction: “We wish each and every one of you a long and satisfying career at the Bar.” 

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